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National Print Museum

The National Print Museum on Dublin's Haddington Road is a delight not only for graphic designers but anyone with a curious mind. Tucked away in the upmarket south central district of Dublin 4, the museum documents the history of printing in Ireland, with an array of strange and wonderful machines, including many early computers. Opened in 1996, the museum is housed in a pretty building known as Garrison Chapel, which was previously a British soldier's church, and was the execution place of famous Irish revolutionary Erskine Childers. With over 10,000 artefacts, the museum's extensive collection includes

  • A replica Gutenberg press
  • A Wharfedale machine
  • Metal and wooden type sets
  • Printing blocks
  • Past newspaper front pages broadcasting some of the great moments in history
  • Ancient Irish books and pamphlets

The first floor contains the printing machines, which are on permanent display. Surrounding pillars are printed on all sides with information about the process involved in printing. Visitors are allowed some interaction with the equipment. Upstairs houses the temporary exhibitions. 

Children's Area

On the first floor, the museum has a "make and do" area for children, where they can create their own fun little books and more. The museum also hosts Family Fun Days. 

Workshops

The museum also hosts various workshops in calligraphy, drawing, bookmaking, origami, and more. There are also guided tours, exhibitions, lectures, demonstration days, and other events. 

Cafe and Gift Shop

The museum has a pleasant cafe housed in an airy conservatory at the back of the museum. The cafe menu offers a range of teas, coffees, lunches and brunches. A gift shop has a selection of print-related items. 

Opening Times

Hours of operation at the National Print Museum are Monday-Friday

  • 9am to 5pm

Saturday-Sunday

  • 2pm to 5pm

Image

National Print Museum. Image by Carlos Luna

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