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Lissadell House

Sir Robert Gore-Booth built this unique and beautiful neoclassical mansion in the 1830s. Fashioned from Ballisodore limestone, and located 7km to the northwest of Sligo just off the N4, Lissadell House had remained a family homestead until 2003, when it was sold privately. W.B. Yeats was a regular visitor, and was friendly with two of the Gore-Booth sisters; indeed, he preserved the women and their home in a poem entitled In Memory Of Eva Gore-Booth And Con Markievicz. One sister – Constance – later married and became the Countess Markievicz, famous for her role in the Easter Rising of 1916. Markievicz was also the first woman elected to the Dail (the Irish parliament), then in its infancy. Lissadell House and its beautiful grounds overlook Sligo Bay, amid lush parklands that lead to what is reputed to be the warmest bathing water on the Irish coast. Inside the house itself, there is an exceptional music room and a dining room decorated with unique murals depicting household staff and friends, painted by Count Casmir Markievicz. Also noteworthy is the majestic Kilkenny marble staircase. The Grecian Revival style mansion contains many relics of the Gore-Booth family, accumulated over several generations, including the personal papers of Sir Robert, whose generous and noble nature inspired him to mortgage the estate in order to help impoverished farmers during the famine. There are also a number of souvenirs from worldwide travels of various family members. From the grounds, huge flocks of barnacle geese can be observed wintering in Goose Field, and seals can be seen basking in the sun on the ocean sands below. The present owners of Lissadell House and Demesne are an Irish couple -- Edward Walsh and Constance Cassidy – who have seven children. In keeping with the Gore-Booth’s tradition, they open the house and grounds to the public daily during the summer season.

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Lissadell House

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