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Aran Inspired

Leinster House

Leinster House is a beautiful, palace-like complex of buildings occupied by the Irish Parliament, its members, and staff. It is the meeting place of Dail Eireann, the lower house, and Seanad Eireann, the senate, which together form the two houses of the Oireachtas, Parliament. The Parliament sits in session for 90 days each year.

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St. Anne's Church and Shandon Bells Tower

This popular Cork City landmark, visible across the area, was built in 1722. Also called Shandon Church, its steeple holds eight distinctive bells of the same name, for which the poem by Francis Mahony was written.

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St Finbarr's Cathedral

Saint Finnbar's Cathedral, also known as Fin Barre's Anglican Cathedral, is an impressive Church of Ireland cathedral located in the centre of Cork city. The founder of Cork City chose the site of this 1880 church to build his original church and school around the year 650.

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St. Mary's Pro Cathedral

St. Mary's Pro Cathedra is the main Catholic parish church of Dublin City centre, situated on a back-street, one block east of O'Connell Street. St. Mary's has the unusual status of pro-Cathedral, meaning "temporary" or "acting" Cathedral". The Cathedral was built in 1825, at a time when Catholics still had few rights in the city, where power was held by the ruling Protestant elite.

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Irish Film Insititute

The Irish Film Institute, located at 6 Eustace Street, Dublin 2, has three screens and a three -core mission: to exhibit, preserve, and to educate. Opened in September of 1992, the Institute exhibits the best of international and Irish film culture. It acquires and preserves the Irish film heritage for current and future generations, and educates filmgoers new to the culture, allowing them access to challenging and stimulating cinema. Boasting 424 seats, the Institute is the place to be seen.

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Irish Film Insititute

The Irish Film Institute, located at 6 Eustace Street, Dublin 2, has three screens and a three -core mission: to exhibit, preserve, and to educate. Opened in September of 1992, the Institute exhibits the best of international and Irish film culture. It acquires and preserves the Irish film heritage for current and future generations, and educates filmgoers new to the culture, allowing them access to challenging and stimulating cinema. Boasting 424 seats, the Institute is the place to be seen.

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Belleek Pottery

On the edge of lower Lough Erne, a the northwest Ireland border, is the home of Belleek Pottery, where world famous china is still hand made, much the same way it was in the 1850s. The beginnings of the company make for an interesting story. The founder, John Caldwell Bloomfield, whitewashed his cottage along the Erne River using a white powder that he found on the property. People passing by commented on the extraordinary glow, texture and shine of the finish, so Bloomfield investigated the contents further by having the ingredients examined. It turned out that they made up a perfect recipe for porcelain.

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Connemara National Park

This protected wilderness area is a region of great, remote natural beauty, in one of the most westerly regions of Ireland. Near the Village of Letterfrack, the National Park at Connemara contains an assortment of geological formations, wildlife, and plant life, all gathered into one area for an exhilarating outdoor experience. Located on the slopes of the mountain range known as the Twelve Bens, the plant life is plentiful.

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The Aran Islands

Over the centuries, these barren limestone islands, located about 30 miles offshore in Galway Bay, have been transformed into beautiful but isolated farmland communities. There are three islands – Inishmore, Inishmaan, and Inisheer. The presence of Iron Age Forts on two of the islands indicates that humans lived here from around 3000 B.C. In the 1800’s, the population was decimated by famine and emigration. Early in the following century, novelists revived interest in the Arans, and American film director Robert O’Flaherty filmed the classic documentary, Man of Aran, on Inishmore.

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Limerick City

This medieval fortress city began as a settlement for Danish Vikings in the 9th century at the head of the estuary of the River Shannon. As the centuries passed, it grew and expanded to become Ireland’s fourth largest city, partly due to its location at the intersection of several of the country’s most well travelled roadways. Today, Limerick City is a thriving industrial port city. Although it has acquired a reputation for dullness, that is mostly because of its depiction in the novel and movie Angela’s Ashes, by Frank Mc Court. Since the days of Angela, many renovations have been accomplished and Limerick City has become an attractive and modern area.

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